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Posts Tagged ‘Wild Trout’

Following my discovery of the magical little pool on the local stream trickling around our village, I decided to have a re-visit with a few long reach garden tools in an attempt to slightly improve the fishing potential. Nothing too disturbing as I always prefer to leave nature to itself as a rule, just a small tidy up of existing hazards and snags to improve the flow, and the removal of several sections of Himalayan Balsam that have appeared following the wet winter. I also cut a narrow route through a high nettle copse to a second small swim tight to the old railway bridge.

For those of you who as yet unaware of the spread of Himalayan Balsam then I strongly suggest that you read up about and learn to recognise it and how to remove it (obviously seek permission of the land owner as some people unfortunately treat it as an attractive and welcome plant, even to the extent of spreading the seed themselves!!!). This plant could ultimately lead to severe river bank destruction if not eradicated and I understand it is on the EA’s hit list along with signal crayfish). A good starting point is to read this article.

And so a couple of before and after pics.

Towards the Bridge - Before

Towards the Bridge – Before

A general removal of debris, Balsam and the reduction in size of a large overhanging branch.

Towards the Bridge - After

Towards the Bridge – After

No weed, rush or sweet grass was touched as this is providing good cover for the smaller fish present, plus a good ambush site for the resident Perch. And still plenty of bankside vegetation overhanging a slightly undercut bank, again also providing good cover. In fact I swear I saw a small Jack Pike come charging out of this cover following my float splashdown. Hmmm! Makes sense to see the Jacks here as about a mile or so downstream this water joins with the Moors River which is known for it’s Pike.

Pool exit - Before

Pool exit – Before

Almost entirely an exercise in the removal of old debris (lots of it), though a small amount of pruning was made to the overhanging trees.

Pool Exit - After

Pool Exit – After

Vastly improved pool. At this, the widest point in this small pool the width is estimated to be about 25-30ft with a max depth of around 4ft towards the far bank. Depth of water below the weed and sweet grass is about 2½ft. The far bank has been left as is. There are a large number of underwater roots with numerous hollows and undercuts providing additional shelter for fish.

I have fished this pool on three additional occasions since carrying out this work and myself and No.2 Son have consistently caught Dace, Perch, Roach and Wild Brown Trout. Even the wife caught a trout, unfortunately (the screams of joy and fulfilment  deafened all within 50yds, mammal, fish, insect and human).

Shortly after publishing my original post on this stream (Small Stream Discoveries) I was contacted by village fishing buddy Steve asking where this pool was. Well, local lad as he is I gave him directions and then met him there the same evening. Steve was keen to give it a go, especially for the wild trout, and we returned on the Wednesday with a half pint of maggots and plenty of hope. A few Dace and Perch caught, and I am pleased to say that Steve got his wish.

Steve's First Wild Trout

Steve’s First Wild Trout

Wild Brown Trout

Wild Brown Trout

They may not be big, but they put up a helluva scrap.

I have no doubt the story of this stream will be continued.

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A few posts ago I talked about the small stream that flows alongside and the length of our village (Testing Our Little Stream). Visually devoid of any finned life, I had spotted and managed to catch a fish!!! Small Perch (no surprise there), but a fish nonetheless.

To continue the topic, I recently spotted a photograph that had been posted on one of the many fishing Facebook groups I frequent. This pic was of a small stream that was being explored and fished by one of the members. The similarities in the picture to a particular pool on my own local stream were uncanny, so I decided to re-visit that spot and check it out. The opportunity arose while I was visiting my good friend John yesterday, who lives only a couple of hundred yards away from the stream.

The pool location is where an old railway line passes over the stream. Beneath the small overgrown bridge is a narrow weir dropping into a pool of around 3-4 feet in depth. This pool is no more than 25 ft at the widest point and continues for about 20 yards below the bridge prior to the stream reverting back to the normal 6-8ft width and 4-12in depth.

Small Stream Bridge Pool

Small Stream Bridge Pool

I stood and watched the water for about 10 minutes and spotted the one fish cruising around close by, close enough to identify as a small Chub. I also noticed a couple of small rises just to the edge of the main flow near the far bank. So once again fish were present in what many took as a lifeless stream. Well that was good enough for me then. Back home, a quick grab of some gear and back to John’s to set up.

Downstream Section of Pool

Downstream Section of Pool

A small 8ft LRF rod was used due to the restricted space, set up with what was available off my bench, small reel loaded with 4lb fluorocarbon, small loaded waggler with three strung out no.6 shot to a size 16 hook. I could have done with a slightly longer rod but my next suitable choice was 13ft. A bit too much for this location! John rummaged around in his compost bin and found three small worms for me; a slice of white bread; small bag of 3mm Halibut pellets for a bit of feed and a few hookable pellets just in case.

All set up so back to the pool (I would love to know what people were thinking when they saw me walking the road from John’s to the stream, rod made up and over my arm; tackle bag slung over my shoulder. Not a usual sight around here).

A few pellets thrown into the small current to try and grab some attention, a small chunk of worm on the hook and second trot through and the first fish comes in. No surprise in another very obliging little Perch.

Small Stream Perch

Small Stream Perch

This was followed by two Dace, one Roach and another larger Perch – all on worm scraps.

Dace

Dace

Roach

Roach

No sign of the larger Chub I had spotted earlier, but I did notice a couple of larger fish further towards the small weir. Unable to make them out with the dappled sunlight on the water, I persisted in trying to tempt them. Worm drew no response, as did pellet. So a pinch of bread flake was trotted through. Bingo!

Bread Loving Small Stream Trout

Bread Loving Small Stream Trout

So there I was with a few small fish caught on worm, and what do I catch on bread? A small wild Brown Trout. Go figure!

So there we go! 45 minutes fishing in a scruffy little stream considered by most as no more than a ditch used for storm drain purposes, and supposedly lifeless. The exploration of this stream will continue. And I’ll be back for those Chub.

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